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Posts for category: Dental Procedures

YouCanHaveaSuccessfulImplantOutcomeifYourDiabetesisUnderControl

Around one in ten U.S. adults have diabetes, a metabolic disease that can disrupt other aspects of a person's health like wound healing and vision. It could also cause complications with dental implants, the premier replacement choice for missing teeth.

There are two basic types of diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas stops producing insulin, a hormone needed to regulate the amount of sugar glucose in the bloodstream. With the more prevalent type 2 diabetes, the body either doesn't produce enough insulin or doesn't respond efficiently to the insulin produced.

Uncontrolled diabetes can contribute to several dangerous health conditions. In addition to vision impairment and poor wound healing, diabetics are at higher risk for other problems like kidney disease or nerve damage. Drastic swings in blood glucose levels can also cause coma or death.

Many diabetics, though, are able to manage their condition through diet, exercise, medications and regular medical care. Even so, they may still encounter problems with wound healing, which could complicate getting a dental implant.

An implant is composed of a titanium metal post imbedded into the jawbone. Because of its affinity with titanium, bone cells naturally grow and adhere to the implant's metal surface. Several weeks after implant surgery, enough bone growth occurs to fully secure the implant within the jaw.

But this integration process may be slower for diabetics because of sluggish wound healing. It's possible for integration to not fully occur in diabetic patients after implant surgery, increasing the risk of eventually losing the implant.

Fortunately, though, evidence indicates this not to be as great a concern as once thought. A number of recent group studies comparing diabetic and non-diabetic implant patients found little difference in outcomes—both groups had similar success rates (more than 95 percent).

The only exception, though, were diabetic patients with poor glucose control, who had much slower bone integration that posed a threat to a successful implant outcome. If you're in this situation, it's better if you're first able to better control your blood glucose levels before you undergo surgery.

So, while diabetes is something to factor into your implant decision, your chances remain good for a successful outcome. Just be sure you're doing everything you can to effectively manage your diabetes.

If you would like more information on diabetes and dental health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants & Diabetes.”

SmileEnhancementsThatCouldMakeYourWeddingDayLikeNoOther

Each of life's moments are precious—but some are more precious than others. For one like your wedding day, you want to look your very best.

Be sure your teeth and gums are also ready for that once in a lifetime moment. Here are a few cosmetic enhancements that can transform your smile appearance.

Dental cleanings. Having your teeth cleaned professionally not only boosts your dental health, but it can also enhance your smile's brightness. A dental cleaning removes plaque and tartar that can yellow and dull teeth. With plaque out of the way, your teeth's natural translucence can shine through.

Teeth whitening. For an even brighter smile, consider teeth whitening. We apply a bleaching solution that temporarily whitens your teeth. With a little care on your part and occasional touchups, your brighter smile could last well beyond your wedding day.

Tooth repair. A chipped or cracked tooth can ruin an otherwise perfect smile. We can often repair mild flaws by bonding tooth-colored composite resins to the defective area, usually in one visit. Porcelain veneers or crowns can mask more moderate imperfections, but they must be undertaken well in advance of your big day.

Teeth replacements. We can restore those missing teeth ruining your smile with dental implants. An implant replaces the tooth root as well as the crown to create a stable and durable hold that can last for years. But similar to porcelain restorations, an implant restoration could take months—so plan ahead.

Orthodontics. Correcting a bite problem through orthodontics can have a huge impact on your smile. Straightening teeth isn't just for teenagers—you can undergo treatment at any age. And if you opt for clear aligners, no one but you and your orthodontist need know you're wearing them.

Cosmetic gum surgery. Even if your teeth look perfect, too much of your gums showing could detract from your smile. If your “gummy smile” is caused by excess gum tissue, there are a number of plastic surgical techniques that can restructure the gums so that they appear in right proportion with the teeth.

If you want a more attractive smile on your wedding day, see us as soon as possible for a full evaluation and assessment of your needs. Depending on what you need, we have the means to make your smile live up to that moment of moments.

If you would like more information on smile enhancements, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Planning Your Wedding Day Smile.”

SedationCanHelpanAnxiousChildRelaxDuringDentalTreatment

There are different ways to ease a child's potential nervousness with dental visits, like starting those visits around their first birthday or seeing a pediatric dentist who specializes in children. But even doing those things won't guarantee your child won't develop some form of dental anxiety, which could complicate their dental care.

To help make appointments easier for anxious children, many dentists use conscious sedation as a means of helping them relax. With this technique, the dentist administers a mild sedative to the child to take the edge off their nervousness, while allowing them to remain awake during treatment.

Sedation isn't anesthesia, the means we use to stop pain during treatment (although sedation may be used with anesthesia). Rather, sedation reduces emotional fear and anxiety. And unlike general anesthesia, a sedated child can still breathe without assistance and, depending on the depth of the sedation, respond to physical and verbal stimuli.

In most cases, children are administered sedation medications by mouth, usually as a syrup, although on occasion it might be delivered intravenously with an IV. The dose is usually given some time before their treatment session after the dentist has evaluated them. Dentists mostly use mild sedatives like Midazolam or Hydroxyzine with very little risk of side effects for children.

During the procedure, a designated staff member continually monitors the child's vital signs. Besides heart rate, pulse and respirations, they may also check the child's exhaled carbon dioxide levels to ensure they're breathing normally.

After the treatment session is over, staff will continue to monitor the child until their vital signs return to pre-sedation levels. If the child is of driving age, they'll need someone to drive them home. Children who've been sedated should remain home for the rest of the day, but they can usually return to school the next day depending on what kind of dental work they've undergone.

Dentists follow strict protocols for pediatric sedation adopted by the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Dental Society, and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. In addition, many states have also established processes for administering sedation therapy. It's a safe and effective method to ease a child's anxiety over their dental visit.

If you would like more information on making dental visits easier for kids, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Sedation Dentistry For Kids.”

By Douglas L. Schneck, DDS
April 26, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implant  
4ReasonsDentalImplantsAreaWiseChoiceforToothReplacement

You've lost some teeth, and now you have to decide how to replace them. A fixed bridge or a partial denture are certainly good options. But the best choice today that dentistry has to offer is dental implants.

Implants have exploded in popularity among both dentists and patients, offering exceptional quality in life-likeness and durability. But they do have one drawback that might cause you to hesitate in choosing them: They're usually more expensive than other common tooth replacement systems, even more so if you're replacing each individual missing tooth with an implant.

But before you pass on them for something more affordable, take another look at dental implants. Here are 4 reasons why implants could be the wiser option for tooth replacement.

Life-like and functional. Other restorations can effectively mimic the appearance of real teeth, and they're reasonably functional. But implants score at the top in both categories because they replace more of the tooth—not just the crown, but the tooth root as well.

Bone friendly. Other restorations can't stop the gradual bone loss often caused by missing teeth, and dentures in particular can accelerate it. But implants are made of titanium, a bio-compatible metal that's also bone-friendly—bone cells readily grow and adhere to its surface. This accumulated growth around the implant site helps slow or stop bone loss.

Long-term savings. The integration of bone and implant creates a durable hold that can last for several years, possibly outlasting other restorations in the same situation. Taking into account all the costs—installation, maintenance and possible replacement—that can occur over the life of a restoration, implants could actually cost less in the long run.

Versatile. Implants can be used for more than single tooth replacements—they can be incorporated with other restorations like bridges or dentures to provide better support. Marrying implants with traditional tooth replacement systems can be less costly than implants individually while enhancing benefits like durability and bone strength.

Dental implants may not be right for everyone, particularly those who've experienced advanced bone loss. But if a thorough dental exam shows you're a good candidate, dental implants could be well worth the investment in your health and appearance.

If you would like more information on dental implant restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants: Your Best Option for Replacing Teeth.”

By Douglas L. Schneck, DDS
March 16, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
6SignsYourChildCouldBeDevelopingaPoorBite

If your child has seen the dentist regularly, and brushed and flossed daily, there's a good chance they've avoided advanced tooth decay. But another problem might already be growing right under your nose—a poor dental bite (malocclusion).

A dental bite refers to the way the upper and lower teeth fit together. In a normal bite the teeth are in straight alignment, and the upper teeth slightly extend in front of and over the lower when the jaws are shut. But permanent teeth erupting out of position or a jaw developing abnormally can set the stage for a malocclusion.

Although the full effects of a malocclusion may not manifest until later, there may be signs of its development as early as age 6. If so, it may be possible to identify a budding bite problem and “intercept” it before it goes too far, correcting it or reducing its severity.

Here are 6 signs your school-age child could be developing a malocclusion.

Excessive spacing. If the spacing between teeth seems too wide, it could mean the size of your child's teeth are out of proportion with their jaw.

Underbite. Rather than the normal upper front teeth covering the lower, the lower teeth extend out and over the upper teeth.

Open bite. There's a space or gap between the upper and lower teeth even when the jaws are shut.

Crowding. Due to a lack of space on the jaw, incoming teeth don't have enough room to erupt and may come in misaligned or “crooked.”

Crossbites. Some of the lower teeth, either in front or back of the jaw, overlap the upper teeth, while the rest of the upper teeth overlap normally.

Protrusion or retrusion. This occurs if the upper front teeth or jaw appear too far forward (protrusion) or the lower teeth or jaw are positioned too far back (retrusion).

Besides watching out for the preceding signs yourself, it's also a good idea to have your child undergo a comprehensive bite evaluation with an orthodontist around age 6. If that does reveal something amiss with their bite, intervention now could correct or lessen the problem and future treatment efforts later.

If you would like more information on children's bite development, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.